Updates from Keijo! Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • Keijo! 03:10 on 2017/03/31 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: xrdp x11rdp jessie clipboard   

    Compile xrdp (neutrino) to work with X11rdp and enable clipboard copy/paste under Debian Jessie 

    This is basically a compiler script to put together xrdp, X11rdp, vanilla MATE (without many extras), and make it all work right out of the box under a clean Debian Jessie install. This won’t contemplate keyboard mapping from the start since I couldn’t figure it out… yet. For now all I’m doing is to fire up a MATE-Terminal instance and type ‘setxkbmap latam‘. Works for me.

    PRE: run as root (sudo -i) on a fully updated system (apt-get update && apt-get -y upgrade)

    (More …)

    Advertisements
     
  • Keijo! 11:41 on 2016/08/25 Permalink | Reply  

    So I stumbled upon a blog post here. Its title pretty much approached what I wanted to accomplish, so I took its method and refined it to my own. Here is what I came up with: Issue iptables (-L -n) to show the chains: iptables -L -n Chain INPUT (policy ACCEPT) target prot opt source destination fail2ban-default tcp -- 0.0.0.0/0 0.0.0.0/0 ACCEPT udp -- 0.0.0.0/0 0.0.0.0/0 multiport dports 500,4500 ACCEPT udp -- 0.0.0.0/0 0.0.0.0/0 udp dpt:1701 policy match dir in pol ipsec DROP udp -- 0.0.0.0/0 0.0.0.0/0 udp dpt:1701 fail2ban-ssh tcp -- 0.0.0.0/0 0.0.0.0/0 Chain FORWARD (policy ACCEPT) target prot opt source destination DROP all -- 0.0.0.0/0 0.0.0.0/0 ctstate INVALID ACCEPT all -- 0.0.0.0/0 0.0.0.0/0 ctstate RELATED,ESTABLISHED DROP all -- 0.0.0.0/0 0.0.0.0/0 Chain OUTPUT (policy ACCEPT) target prot opt source destination Chain fail2ban-default (1 references) target prot opt source destination REJECT all -- 181.109.140.23 0.0.0.0/0 reject-with icmp-port-unreachable REJECT all -- 186.136.174.237 0.0.0.0/0 reject-with icmp-port-unreachable REJECT all -- 84.53.243.133 0.0.0.0/0 reject-with icmp-port-unreachable REJECT all -- 113.53.236.29 0.0.0.0/0 reject-with icmp-port-unreachable RETURN all -- 0.0.0.0/0 0.0.0.0/0 Looking at the iptables output, I focus on the “fail2ban-*” chains and discern what to do next. In the excerpt above, the fail2ban-default shows 4 different “REJECT all” addresses that acted naughty somehow. I’m going to release the ones that don’t seem harmful (probably deleted user accounts still hammering onto mail).  These two will go away: 181.109.140.23 186.136.174.237 So, to have it done, the line will contain:

    iptables -D fail2ban-default -s 181.109.140.23 -j REJECT
    and
    iptables -D fail2ban-default -s 181.109.140.23 -j REJECT
    This will delete (-D) from the fail2ban-default chain the source IP (-s) with its corresponding jump action (-j) REJECT. You can check and modify the containing parameters, as chain (-D), source IP (-s), and jump action (-j) to fit your deeds.  

    undefined
     
  • Keijo! 07:32 on 2010/09/26 Permalink | Reply  

    ┬íHola mundo! 

    Welcome to WordPress.com. This is your first post. Edit or delete it and start blogging!

     
    • Mr WordPress 07:32 on 2010/09/26 Permalink | Reply

      Hi, this is a comment.
      To delete a comment, just log in, and view the posts’ comments, there you will have the option to edit or delete them.

c
Compose new post
j
Next post/Next comment
k
Previous post/Previous comment
r
Reply
e
Edit
o
Show/Hide comments
t
Go to top
l
Go to login
h
Show/Hide help
shift + esc
Cancel